Sahil Bloom

@SahilBloom

about 1 month ago

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This demonstration of the engineering behind an ancient Egyptian lock is marvelous. t.co/mIQrKw5xrU

I’m fascinated by feats of ancient engineering. This aqueduct was built around 600 BC in Armenia and runs through a cliff for certain stretches. Remarkable. t.co/E4grPUH4Rs

Chand Baori is a massive stepwell in Abhaneri, Rajasthan, India built starting in the 8th century. 3500 steps over 13 stories that extend 30m into the ground. t.co/fTqkDbs17V

A collection of 11 underground churches in Ethiopia were built in the 12th and 13th centuries. They’re connected by a complex network of underground drainage systems. t.co/djFKHZ48sa

Can’t forget the Leshan Giant Buddha! 71 meter stone statue carved into the cliff face between 713-803 during the Tang dynasty. Most impressive: Complex drainage system that has allowed the structure to avoid erosion and remain standing for over 1,000 years. t.co/NMETP097PL

What are some of the most insane ancient engineering feats you’ve seen?

New life goal: to go see all of these in person. Need to make a list and start checking them off. Who’s in?

The most common response: Machu Picchu. The Incas who built it in the Peruvian Andes 500+ years ago had no wheels, iron, steel, or written language. All the more incredible that it has endured throughout the centuries. Top of the bucket list destination… t.co/0JfgI3Kce0

I share a lot of random, interesting stuff on here. Hopefully you all learn a few things from it or find that it sparks your curiosity to go deeper. Follow me @SahilBloom for more of these random rabbit holes. Let’s explore.

That lock video definitely belongs on the r/oddlysatisfying page on @Reddit. @alexisohanian what do you think?

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